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3 Essentials For Remote Team Success
Remote work requires a new approach to managing facilitating employee success. Here are three imperatives to creating successful remote teams.

Home » People & Culture » 3 Essentials For Remote Team Success

3 Essentials For Remote Team Success

Remote work requires a new approach to managing facilitating employee success. Here are three imperatives to creating successful remote teams.
Based on recent research, it looks like you may need to more fully embrace remote work if you want to snag and retain the best talent going forward. Current data from a Flexjobs survey reports that 60% of employees said they’d quit rather than return to their in-person offices, and only 2% said they’d be interested in returning to full-time, in-person work. Employees who are highly sought after in this labor market highly value remote work options. This presents you with an opportunity to leverage remote or hybrid offerings to attract new hires or retain current ones; even offering a hybrid or partially remote work schedule could make a huge difference when courting job seekers.

But like most things, with opportunity comes challenges. Most managers would admit that effectively onboarding new employees can be difficult under normal circumstances. However, remote work presents unique challenges that may not be considered in office settings, such as balancing household activities and technology issues. Here are three imperatives to creating successful remote teams.

60% of employees said they'd quit rather than return to their in-person offices

per Flexjobs survey

1. Have the right mindset and approach

Hire the right people for remote and hybrid positions. Not everyone enjoys or excels in remote work environments. It’s critical to evaluate a candidate’s disposition for remote work during the interview process.

Shift your focus to work done rather than solely hours worked. Whenever possible, allow your employees flexible hours enabling them to manage their life responsibilities and mental health, and workloads.

Get to know your team as people and individuals, not just professionals. Understand their life goals, aspirations, personal challenges, and more so that you can better understand how to support their needs through the work environment.

Develop a level of trust. Trust between managers, teams, and individuals is essential in effective remote and hybrid units. Resist the urge to micromanage, rely on evaluating outcomes, and guide your teams to do the same.

 

2. Develop and communicate clear expectations and structure

Establishing the proper operational foundation for remote teams is critical to the success of your remote and hybrid employees. Remote workers don’t have the option of walking down the hall to talk to a colleague or asking the person next to them where to find a form. Without the proper foundation, your team will become less productive, frustrated, and eventually lose motivation. To avoid this:

Provide extensive onboarding and training materials that include organizational information and contact details to direct any questions.

Have established and clearly documented processes for each function and across teams. While this is important for any scaling business, it’s critical for remote teams to enable efficient, quality outputs.

Leverage a select group of technologies that make assessing information and communication easy for remote workers, such as instant messaging and project management tools.

Discuss expectations for after-hours communication, non-emergency communications, and general expectations around how often employees need to be online, general check-ins.

 

3. Communicate and collaborate…a lot.

Remote and hybrid teams don’t naturally have the same casual and spontaneous opportunities to interact as a team working for the same physical space, leaving remote employees feeling isolated or left out. To avoid this, you need to be intentional about establishing a culture of transparency and communication. Here are some thoughts:

Intentionally foster community and relationships across the organization with group projects, presentations, and more extensive collaboration opportunities that strengthen bonds and communication between teammates.

Make structured, weekly face-to-face video check-ins (both for teams and one-on-ones) part of your company’s routine, allowing managers and groups to connect professionally and personally and avoid burnout.

Task your team with creating opportunities for both structured and spontaneous interactions throughout the typical work week leveraging video and other technologies – make this part of your culture.

Have ongoing professional development conversations so that remote workers stay connected to internal opportunities for advancement.

Amplify and celebrate remote employees’ success with the entire team to promote inclusivity.

Consistently seek out feedback through informal conversations and more formal means such as surveys.

Based on recent research, it looks like you may need to more fully embrace remote work if you want to snag and retain the best talent going forward. Current data from a Flexjobs survey reports that 60% of employees said they’d quit rather than return to their in-person offices, and only 2% said they’d be interested in returning to full-time, in-person work. Employees who are highly sought after in this labor market highly value remote work options. This presents you with an opportunity to leverage remote or hybrid offerings to attract new hires or retain current ones; even offering a hybrid or partially remote work schedule could make a huge difference when courting job seekers.

But like most things, with opportunity comes challenges. Most managers would admit that effectively onboarding new employees can be difficult under normal circumstances. However, remote work presents unique challenges that may not be considered in office settings, such as balancing household activities and technology issues. Here are three imperatives to creating successful remote teams.

60% of employees said they'd quit rather than return to their in-person offices

per Flexjobs survey

1. Have the right mindset and approach

Hire the right people for remote and hybrid positions. Not everyone enjoys or excels in remote work environments. It’s critical to evaluate a candidate’s disposition for remote work during the interview process.

Shift your focus to work done rather than solely hours worked. Whenever possible, allow your employees flexible hours enabling them to manage their life responsibilities and mental health, and workloads.

Get to know your team as people and individuals, not just professionals. Understand their life goals, aspirations, personal challenges, and more so that you can better understand how to support their needs through the work environment.

Develop a level of trust. Trust between managers, teams, and individuals is essential in effective remote and hybrid units. Resist the urge to micromanage, rely on evaluating outcomes, and guide your teams to do the same.

 

2. Develop and communicate clear expectations and structure

Establishing the proper operational foundation for remote teams is critical to the success of your remote and hybrid employees. Remote workers don’t have the option of walking down the hall to talk to a colleague or asking the person next to them where to find a form. Without the proper foundation, your team will become less productive, frustrated, and eventually lose motivation. To avoid this:

Provide extensive onboarding and training materials that include organizational information and contact details to direct any questions.

Have established and clearly documented processes for each function and across teams. While this is important for any scaling business, it’s critical for remote teams to enable efficient, quality outputs.

Leverage a select group of technologies that make assessing information and communication easy for remote workers, such as instant messaging and project management tools.

Discuss expectations for after-hours communication, non-emergency communications, and general expectations around how often employees need to be online, general check-ins.

 

3. Communicate and collaborate…a lot.

Remote and hybrid teams don’t naturally have the same casual and spontaneous opportunities to interact as a team working for the same physical space, leaving remote employees feeling isolated or left out. To avoid this, you need to be intentional about establishing a culture of transparency and communication. Here are some thoughts:

Intentionally foster community and relationships across the organization with group projects, presentations, and more extensive collaboration opportunities that strengthen bonds and communication between teammates.

Make structured, weekly face-to-face video check-ins (both for teams and one-on-ones) part of your company’s routine, allowing managers and groups to connect professionally and personally and avoid burnout.

Task your team with creating opportunities for both structured and spontaneous interactions throughout the typical work week leveraging video and other technologies – make this part of your culture.

Have ongoing professional development conversations so that remote workers stay connected to internal opportunities for advancement.

Amplify and celebrate remote employees’ success with the entire team to promote inclusivity.

Consistently seek out feedback through informal conversations and more formal means such as surveys.

The Last Word

As the “new normal” in human resources management continues to evolve, you will need to stay nimble and adaptive to attract and retain the talent you need to grow your business.

Reach out to discuss how we can help you build and implement the foundation you need to successfully grow your business and your team.

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